Features

WOULD YOU RATHER: New Year

Kajamba Fitz-Henley YOUTHLINK WRITER

Resolutions, Celebrations and reinvention ... those are typically the words we begin to think about as we are approaching a new year. Whether you're into New Year's festivities or not, you can't deny that it is a time which prompts reflection. This week Youthlink is prompting to start an early version of that reflection with these situations.

It's New Year's Eve and your group of friends is having a get-together at your best friend's house. They insist that they need to light firecrackers, for it to be a proper New Year's celebration. You're the only one with easyaccess to firecrackers, so you are charged with bringing enough for the entire group. However, the area where your friends plan to light the firecrackers is prone to fires —fires have been ignited there before and your friend's neighbours constantly complain about their property being damaged. Your friend assuresyou that it is okay and that nothing will happen, even though he/she is known to have caused a fire in that area before. You are scared of disappointing the group by not bringing the firecrackers, but you also think you know better than to do it.

WOULD YOU RATHER:

• Carry the firecrackers and risk the fire? (30%)

• Leave the firecrackers and risk 'ruining' the New Year's celebration? (70%)

• "It dependson whether it's a friend I can trust. If it's my bestfriend, I'd probably bring the thing becausemistakeshappen,but that doesn'tguarantee it will happenagain; might as well risk it for the celebration." (Remario, 16)

• "The better thing for thefriends to do would be to just go somewhereelse;maybe somewherewith real fireworks —simple!" (Malia, 16)

It's tradition in your family to spend New Year's Day in church, giving thanks for another year. The church service usually lasts the entire day and your parents insist that it is only reverent to stay for all of it. However, your friend is about to move overseas and he/she has planned a get-together for New Year's Day. It will be your last chance to seehim/her before the migration. You've asked your parents to go, but they insist that church is mandatory. You are 18, and you feel that that is too old for them to be forcing you to go. On the other hand, if you disobey them by not going to church, they will consider you irreverent and ungrateful to God. They would also likely cut off your financial allowance, thus forcing you to get a job.

WOULD YOU RATHER:

• Disobey your parents in favour of going to see you friend for the last time? (10%)

• Go to church and stay in your parents' good graces while missing your friend? (90%)

• "That seemsunfair. Youmust can usepart of the day to go to church and then the rest to seeyour friend. " (Trisha, 18)

• "I think church and giving thanks are important, so I would go to the service.You'll beable to see your friend in thefuture, God willing." (Shannon, 19)

You and your sister have a habit of breaking New Year resolutions within the first three months. You both really want to honour the resolutions; however, you always forget —so you've made a pact to help you keep the resolutions. The agreement is, whoever breaks the resolution will have to do the other's homework for the remainder of the year. The resolution is to ask your crush on a date within the first three months of the year. Sadly, it has recently been rumoured that your crush is already in a relationship. You don't want do it — due to the rumours and your own terrible nerves about the situation —but your sister goes to the same school and she will know if you don't do it. She is also very stubborn and you know she remembers the pact. The three months are almost up.

WOULD YOU RATHER:

• Ask your crush out and face the likely rejection? (60%)

• Break the resolution and do your sister's homework for the rest of the year? (40%)

• "Rejection is nothing comparedto months of homework on top Ofwhat I already have." (Krista, 17)

• "I've had a crush for years beforeand never asked him out. No stupid resolution is going to make me do it. We'd have to find a way around that pact." (Analiesia, 15)

Section: 
Email Youtube Instagram Twitter Facebook
@youthlinkmag